The Electrophysical Forum aims to provide an interactive platform for questions, comments, discussion and opinion related to the use of Electro Physical modalities in therapy. It is supported by an Internationally renowned expert panel and a broad sphere of clinicians, researchers, educators and students. Active participation is welcomed.

Sign up to start posting >>>

Ask a question and get it answered by your peers and respected experts

Answer a question and be recognised, raising your international profile



Create a link to us from your website, blog or social media platform.


EMS Ab Stimulator

I have an EMS ab stimulator that has gel conductors stick onto your stomache, various intensity levels..... there is a warning " Do not use If you have any metal implant electronicaly run/charged, such as a pacemaker or defibullator" Doesn't say anything about metal screw/pin back implants so I would think it's ok? Would appreciate your opinions on this.

L. Weiner

9 months ago

Back to General Electrotherapy

Post a reply

929 views

ezusbuyoutreach436
ezusbuyoutreach436

The conduction of electrical current produced by electrical stimulation is unlikely affected by most metal components, including surgical metal implants. Metal implant is no longer a contraindication for electrical stimulation. But still you have to be careful while using the ems stimulator.

Cliff Eaton
Cliff Eaton

From my colleagues posts I believe you have your answer. I write to concur with my colleagues that metal work is NOT contraindicated. This is due to current EMS units having a biphasic, alternating current, which compensates for any positive ions that were responsible, in the past, for creating a thermal effect Pacemakers remain contraindicated, as despite it being unlikely that EMs would affect them we cannot conduct studies to demonstrate that they will not Best wishes Cliff

Prof Tim Watson
Prof Tim Watson

Agree with Prof David - no problem if the implants are 'passive' i.e. pins, screws, wires, plates etc. If there is any Battery Powered implant - like a pacemaker or ICD etc, the safest to assume all e stim is contraindicated. Hope that helps. Tim

Prof David Selkowitz
Prof David Selkowitz

Superficial metal implants, meaning close to or protruding through the surface of the skin. With what you describe you'd like to do, putting the electrodes on the abdominals, this would not be an issue. If you wanted to put the electrodes in the back region, due to the typical location of the hardware for metal rods in the spine, such as for fusions, this would not be an issue; unless metal staples or sutures were protruding through the skin. I hope that clarifies. Let me know if you need further clarification.

sheba600381
sheba600381

What are very superficial implants? Define for me please cuz Im not sure what that means. Ty

Prof David Selkowitz
Prof David Selkowitz

By the way, it would only be a potential issue with superficial implants if you were putting the electrodes in that area, not on the abs.

Prof David Selkowitz
Prof David Selkowitz

Hello. Using the stimulator would be contraindicated in patients with the implanted devices you mentioned, but it would be no problem with the metal spine implants unless, perhaps, they are very superficial. If you are interested, there is a paper in Physiotherapy Canada from 2010 that surveys various physical agents and their contraindications and precautions; essentially a clinical practice guideline paper. Hope that helps.

1-8 of 8

Reply to this discussion

You cannot edit posts or make replies: